11 Majestic Photos of Spring in Vermont

Vermont is a state in US in the region of the New England. It is the only state that does not have contact with the Atlantic ocean of the New England area. A peaceful state with low population and buildings no taller than 124 feet (38 meters). This state has a variety of flora and fauna. Well the vegetation of the flora and the movement of the animals starts with the rising temperatures in spring. The green leaves and the colorful flowers, the widespread forests and the splashing water down the rivers is the beginning of a new year. Year of joy and fun. Year when the life in Vermont starts to move.

The beavers start building ponds, the chipmunk prepare for mating and creating posterity, butterflies finally break through the caterpillars after the long winter. The birds fly up in the sky to enjoy the new spring sun. Flowers bloom and show their color to affect the animals and insects for a new friendship. Some of them release the irresistible scent, like the purple lilacs.

In this article, thanks to Putneypics and the great collection of photos taken at the springs in 2010 and 2011, we gathered 11 photos where you can feel the happiness and the warmth of the beginning of new lives in Vermont.

Beaver Pond, West Road

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Beaver in the Pond

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Quince bush and barn, Westminster West

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Hardy Winter Survivors in the Vegetable Garden

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Lilac Bloom at Twilight, Putney, Vermont

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

White Pine and Sugar Maple reflected in the beaver pond

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Red-winged Blackbird

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Chipmunk and Trout Lily, Pinnacle Trail

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Evening light, Henwood Hill Road

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Black Swallowtail butterfly (male), Putney Mountain, Vermont

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Common Yellowthroat in spruce tree

Image by Putneypics via Flickr

Related Post
Disqus Comments Loading...

This website uses cookies.